Cataracts and Cataract Surgery

Cataracts and Cataract Surgery

Cataracts:

Your eye has a clear lens inwhich light passes through, allowing you to see.  When this lens loses it transparency, the cloudy tissue that develops is known as a cataract.

Cataracts cause progressive and painless loss of vision.  The lens clouds naturally as we age, so people over the age of 65 usually see a gradual reduction of vision.  It is unknown what causes cataracts. Cataracts in younger people can result from an injury, certain medications or illness such as diabetes.  Prolonged exposure to ultraviolet light may also play a role in the formation of cataracts.  Studies have shown that people who smoke have a high risk of developing cataracts then non-smokers.

Some indications that a cataract may be forming are:

  • Blurred or hazy vision
  • Double vision
  • Poor vision in bright light
  • Seeing halos around lights
  • Poor vision at night
  • Yellowish tinged vision
  • Frequent changes in eyeglasses or contact lens prescription

 

 

 

 

 

Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgery is a minimally invasive procedure that involves numbing the eyes with anesthesia and then making a tiny incision into which an ultrasonic probe is inserted. The probe breaks up, or emulsifies, the cloudy lens into tiny pieces and then suctions them out of the eye. Once the cloudy lens has been removed, a new artificial lens is implanted into the eye. This lens is known as an intraocular lens (IOL) and can often be inserted through the same incision that the old lens was removed from.

Surgery usually takes only a few minutes to perform and is painless for most patients. After the procedure, a patch may be placed over the eye and you will be asked to rest for a while. Patients can return home the very same day but will need someone to drive them home. For the next few days, you may experience itching, mild discomfort, fluid discharge and sensitivity to light and touch. Your doctor may prescribe eye drops to help the healing process and to reduce the risk of infection.

There are several different IOLs available to help each patient achieve the best possible results from his/her cataract surgery. Multifocal IOLs allow for full vision correction at near, intermediate and far distances, completely eliminating the need for eyeglasses or contact lenses in most patients. Some IOLs can also correct astigmatism.

These choices were not always available for cataract patients. In the past, cataract surgery only involved monofocal lenses, which could only focus on objects near or far, but could not adjust to accommodate varying distances. These patients still had to rely on glasses or contact lenses after surgery in order to see clearly at all distances, especially in older patients suffering from presbyopia.